ESXTOP Thresholds

March 18, 2019 at 10:54 am Leave a comment

Hi Guys

Below table provides the recommended thresholds from ESXi . These values can be monitored via ESXTOP commands.

Display Metric Threshold Explanation
CPU %RDY 10 Overprovisioning of vCPUs, excessive usage of vSMP or a limit(check %MLMTD) has been set. Note that you will need to expand the VM Group to see how this is distributed across vCPUs. If you have many vCPUs than per vCPU may be low and this may not be an issue. 10% is per world!
CPU %CSTP 3 Excessive usage of vSMP. Decrease amount of vCPUs for this particular VM. This should lead to increased scheduling opportunities.
CPU %MLMTD 0 The percentage of time the vCPU was ready to run but deliberately wasn’t scheduled because that would violate the “CPU limit” settings. If larger than 0 the world is being throttled due to the limit on CPU.
CPU %SWPWT 5 VM waiting on swapped pages to be read from disk. Possible cause: Memory overcommitment.
MEM MCTLSZ 1 If larger than 0 hosts is forcing VMs to inflate balloon driver to reclaim memory as host is overcommited.
MEM SWCUR 1 If larger than 0 hosts has swapped memory pages in the past. Possible cause: Overcommitment.
MEM SWR/s 1 If larger than 0 host is actively reading from swap(vswp). Possible cause: Excessive memory overcommitment.
MEM SWW/s 1 If larger than 0 host is actively writing to swap(vswp). Possible cause: Excessive memory overcommitment.
MEM CACHEUSD 0 If larger than 0 hosts has compressed memory. Possible cause: Memory overcommitment.
MEM ZIP/s 0 If larger than 0 hosts is actively compressing memory. Possible cause: Memory overcommitment.
MEM UNZIP/s 0 If larger than 0 host has accessing compressed memory. Possible cause: Previously host was overcommited on memory.
MEM N%L 80 If less than 80 VM experiences poor NUMA locality. If a VM has a memory size greater than the amount of memory local to each processor, the ESX scheduler does not attempt to use NUMA optimizations for that VM and “remotely” uses memory via “interconnect”. Check “GST_ND(X)” to find out which NUMA nodes are used.
NETWORK %DRPTX 1 Dropped packets transmitted, hardware overworked. Possible cause: very high network utilization
NETWORK %DRPRX 1 Dropped packets received, hardware overworked. Possible cause: very high network utilization
DISK GAVG 25 Look at “DAVG” and “KAVG” as the sum of both is GAVG.
DISK DAVG 25 Disk latency most likely to be caused by the array.
DISK KAVG 2 Disk latency caused by the VMkernel, high KAVG usually means queuing. This is the ESXi storage stack, the vSCSI layer and the VMM. Check “QUED”.
DISK QUED 1 Queue maxed out. Possibly queue depth set to low, or controller overloaded. Check with array vendor for optimal queue depth value. (Enable this via option “F” aka QSTATS
DISK ABRTS/s 1 Aborts issued by guest(VM) because storage is not responding. For Windows VMs this happens after 60 seconds by default. Can be caused for instance when paths failed or array is not accepting any IO for whatever reason.
DISK RESETS/s 1 The number of commands resets per second.
DISK ATSF 1 The number of failed ATS commands, this value should be 0
DISK ATS 1 The number of successful ATS commands, this value should go up over time when the array supports ATS
DISK DELETE 1 The number of successful UNMAP commands, this value should go up over time when the array supports UNMAP!
DISK DELETE_F 1 The number of failed UNMAP commands, this value should be 0
DISK CONS/s 20 SCSI Reservation Conflicts per second. If many SCSI Reservation Conflicts occur performance could be degraded due to the lock on the VMFS.
VSAN SDLAT 5 Standard deviation of latency, when above 10ms latency contact support to analyze vSAN Observer details to find out what is causing the delay

Source: http://www.yellow-bricks.com/esxtop/#esxtop-thresholds

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Entry filed under: HOW To's.

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